To gain optical drive features, users could either purchase an external USB SuperDrive or other brand, or the bundled Remote Disc software, only for browsing or software installation to access the drive of another computer wirelessly[45] that has the program installed.[46][47] It can also be used to reinstall the system software from the included installation DVD. Remote Disc supports NetBooting, so the Air can boot from its installation DVD in another computer's drive, which requires Remote Install Mac OS X to be running on that computer. The software does not allow playback or information of DVDs, CDs or installing Windows.[45] For these features, an external USB drive is required.[45] More recent versions of OS X replaced the installation DVD with a USB flash drive containing the software, eliminating remote installation.
For Macs, AppleCare+ makes more sense if you’re buying a laptop and you’re worried about the screen, or you just tend to be rough on your computers. Desktop Macs probably aren’t as important to cover, since the likelihood of, say, dropping one is a lot less. Still, Macs have a long life, so you may decide three years of (transferable) protection is worth the extra cost.

Visit our MacBook Air Support page for helpful troubleshooting information. If you have reviewed the articles on the website, and you're still not sure whether your MacBook Air requires service, you can take your MacBook Air to your local Apple Authorized Service Provider ("AASP") or Apple retail store for diagnosis. Alternatively, you can contact Apple. A technical support agent can help you diagnose the issue.   Note:  Diagnostic fees may apply for issues not covered under warranty or the AppleCare Protection Plan (APP).
Apple is about to begin charging users outside of their warranty for online chat support using a new web payment system it recently developed. Sources familiar with the project say Apple is currently expecting to launch the new paid chat support, which will also let customers schedule repairs and replacements online, as early as next week. Here’s how it works:
Through July 1, 2013, the MacBook Air took in 56 percent of all Ultrabook sales in the United States, despite being one of the higher-priced competitors. [66] Apple had previously dominated the premium PC market, in 2009 having a 91 percent market share for PCs priced at more than $1,000, according to NPD, and Ultrabooks were an attempt by other PC manufacturers to move in on Apple's turf.[67] While Apple's MacBook lines were not immune to this consumer trend towards mobile devices,[68] they still managed to ship 2.8 million MacBooks in Q2 2012 (the majority of which were the MacBook Air) compared to 500,000 total Ultrabooks,[69][70] despite there being dozens of Ultrabooks from various manufacturers on the market while Apple only offered 11" and 13" models of the Macbook Air.[71] Forrester Research analyst Frank Gillett attributes Apple's increased success in the enterprise market to the 2010 MacBook Air and the iPad.[72]
A few days ago I spoke to an Apple customer service rep about getting an adapter. I first went on line to see which one I needed, wasn't sure so I asked for professional help. After twenty minutes, after being on hold for about fifteen minutes, I spoke to someone who didn't seem to have a clue. She put me on hold and then got back on the line to tell me which adapter would work. I needed an adapter for my older printer, so one end had to fit into the back of my new Mac and the other fit the printer plug. The adapter arrived today and it was too small at the computer end. I called Apple back. To make a long story short, I spoke to five people - all of them useless. I was wondering if I was speaking Klingon because nobody seemed to understand that I needed the adapter to plug into the back of my computer and that the other end did fit my printer. They kept assuming that the printer end was the problem. I was passed on to a supervisor who was just as clueless. I was then passed on to someone who was to source the right sized adapter for me and she was the worst of the lot. I can't understand how a company that makes my computer has no idea which adapter I would need for it and after five people, finally one of them realizes that Apple doesn't make them. I got all my other adapters at The Source and they fit perfectly, unfortunately they no longer carry this product. The worst customer service ever and not once did anyone say to me to return this item because I was recommended the wrong size. Not once did anyone offer a refund. I sent the stupid thing back this evening with a note for them to 'stick it where the sun don't shine.' Go anywhere else if you need help with products for your Mac - Apple customer service reps don't have a clue.
A Technical Support Incident (TSI) is a request for code-level support for Apple frameworks, APIs, and tools, and is available to members of the Apple Developer Program, Apple Developer Enterprise Program, and MFi Program. Submit a TSI if you cannot fix a bug, have trouble implementing a specific technology, or have other questions about your code. Your incident will be assigned to a Developer Technical Support engineer who can help troubleshoot your code or investigate possible workarounds to fast-track your development. Support is provided in English via email, typically within three business days.

The use of AppleCare Technician Training materials and the successful completion of Apple Service Certification exams do not imply any authorization by Apple to perform repairs or to conduct business directly with Apple or on its behalf. Results from Apple Service Certification exams are used by Apple Authorized Service Providers to assess the competence of repair technicians seeking employment in servicing Apple computers and selected peripherals.

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